No Tres-Passing… Once, Twice or even Three Times…


It’s amazing what you get from a 6-year-old who blends the English language with another language and processes it using their special wit and humour.

While stopped at a red light, my daughter must have noticed a sign which read;

She asked me; “What does No Trespassing mean, Daddy?”

“It means you are not allowed on that property / land… Why? Where did you see that?” I asked.

“Oh, over there, in the construction site” she answered.

Then she continued… “But I thought “trespassing” meant you had to pass the place 3 times… Like Uno, Dues, Tres… you know, Daddy… Tres-passing…”

“Ah, I know dear… Very clever!”

I love it.

 

Doors Open Toronto – May 27th and 28th


Discover the story behind every door at #DoorsOpenOntario 2017!

Join the Ontario Heritage Trust for the 2017 Doors Open Ontario season which includes 44 additional events across the province From May to October.

Explore more than 1,000 sites that help tell Ontario’s stories, from local breweries to natural landscapes, century-old cabins to modern marvels of engineering, and experience Ontario’s unique history from a new perspective. Commemorate the 150th anniversary of Confederation with themed activities, tours, exhibitions and demonstrations – all free of charge! For detailed event information and interactive tools to help you plan your Doors Open Ontario experience, visit doorsopenontario.on.ca.

Many Nations and many peoples have called this place home. MyOntario – A vision over time marks this long history by opening a conversation among Ontarians about our experiences, identities, values and aspirations. Capture your Doors Open Ontario moments and join the conversation: heritagetrust.on.ca/myontario.

Doors Open Ontario – recognized as one of the 2017 Top 100 Festivals & Events in Ontario – is a program of the Ontario Heritage Trust, with funding support provided by the Ontario150 program.

QUOTES

“The Ontario Heritage Trust’s Doors Open Ontario enables Ontarians to explore our vibrant and diverse heritage. Whether old or new, each site offers a glimpse into our shared history as Ontarians – discover these fascinating sites and the stories they tell, and join us as we explore our history, identity and cultural heritage.” – Beth Hanna, Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Heritage Trust

“Ontario’s 150th anniversary is an opportunity to come together and celebrate the incredible province we live in. Doors Open Ontario highlights our rich history through our province’s most fascinating cultural sites. I encourage all Ontarians and visitors to join the festivities and explore Ontario’s heritage during this exciting year.” − Eleanor McMahon, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

Quick Facts

  • Doors Open Ontario 2017 features over 1,000 sites participating in 45 events across the province.
  • 93% of the provincial population live in a community that has hosted a Doors Open Ontario event.
  • Since its inception, Doors Open Ontario has attracted 6.7 million visitors to explore over 16,700 amazing sites.
  • Visitors to Doors Open Ontario contribute to local economies by spending over $5 million in participating communities each year.

Doors Open Ontario 2017 alphabetical list of events

Aurora August 19
Belleville and District September 16
Bradford West Gwillimbury June 17
Brampton September 30
Brockville and the Thousand Islands May 27-28
Bruce County June 10-11
Burlington September 30
Carleton Place September 16-17
Clarington June 10
Cornwall August 19-20
East Elgin September 16
Erin June 10
Fergus-Elora June 17
Gravenhurst June 24
Grimsby September 23
Guelph April 22
Halton Region September 30 – October 1
Hamilton May 6-7
Kawartha Lakes September 9-10
King Township September 23
Kingston June 17
London September 16-17
Markham September 30
Minden Hills September 16-17
Mississauga September 23
Niagara-on-the-Lake September 16-17
Northumberland County June 3-4
Orillia and Area September 30
Oshawa September 30
Ottawa June 3-4
Owen Sound June 3-4
Oxford-Norwich September 23
Peterborough May 6
Quinte West September 16
Richmond Hill May 13
Rideau Lakes August 19-20
St. Catharines June 24
St. Marys September 30
Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry August 19-20
Timmins September 30
Toronto May 27-28
Waterloo Region September 16
Wellington North September 23
Whitby May 6
Whitchurch-Stouffville June 3

The Trust is an agency of the Government of Ontario dedicated to identifying, preserving, protecting and promoting Ontario’s heritage.

doorsopenontario.on.ca heritagetrust.on.ca ontario.ca/150  Facebook: Ontario Heritage Trust  Twitter: @ONheritage Instagram: ONheritage #DoorsOpenOntario #MyOntario #Ontario150

SOURCE Ontario Heritage Trust

For further information: about Doors Open Ontario 2017, contact Kimberly Murphy at 416-325-5074 or kimberly.murphy@heritagetrust.on.ca.

RELATED LINKS http://www.heritagetrust.on.ca

 

Spring Has Sprung, the Grass Has Riz, I Wonder Where the Birdies Is?!?


Ahh, spring.

Ahhh Spring…

Ah-chooooooooo… Damn.  It’s spring.

 

Spring time is finally appearing here in Southern Ontario and aside from the increasing temperatures, here are the 13 most obvious ways to tell that Spring has Sprung.

  1. Sports cars in need of muffler repair and convertible cars are zooming around, blasting their horrid music and looking for attention

  2. A.L.L.E.R.G.I.E.S

  3. People are wearing colours again!  Yay.  Winter is dreary enough and everyone in black makes it that much more bland and blah.

  4. People begin to stink.  Not from sweat, at least not yet, but now is the time of year when they think a little bit of cologne or perfume might be a good idea but it’s not.  It’s horrid if I can smell it over a super-stuffy nose. (See 12)

9.  TAXES!!!  It’s tax time!!  Don’t forget to file, even if you think you don’t owe.  File, file, file!  If you need help anywhere in Canada, search up and hit up inTAXicating.

8.  Flips flops and PJ’s make their returns to coffee shops.  In the winter it’s just too darn cold to roll out of bed and drive or walk to the local coffee shop, but not in the spring!

7.  Exposed skin everywhere on everyone, male, female, young, old… If it’s in combination with leggings or yoga pants, it’s a bonus!

6.  I see neighbours!  Seriously, I cannot believe how little we get out in the winter – especially with kids programs keeping us out and around – I found out this morning that our neighbour had a baby and we didn’t even know she was pregnant.  So hard to tell covered in a giant Canada Goose jacket.

5.  Bikes everywhere!  And I’ve mellowed over the years, so I want bikes and bike lanes everywhere.  I also want safe and clean public transit and I want better roads and more parking for cars.  I want everyone to commute and be happy and healthy and safe.  Hey, City of Toronto… If you want business owners to thrive and survive, back off the parking tickets for people who park in actual spots.  If they park illegally, or block traffic, tag and tow them, but let businesses earn money!

4.  Joggers abound!  I’ve always said that out-of-shape joggers (like myself) run at night when no one can see them shaking and bouncing around or hear them gasping for air.  The fit joggers run during the day where everyone can see them.  Whatever your motivation, just run!

3.  My lawn kicks ass!  My front lawn is very green and soft.  I put the snow on it in the winter before the City salts the street or sidewalk and in the spring, and it makes a difference.  It’s so nice, and I have a neighbour who doesn’t talk to anyone but I catch him walking across the street and touching my grass in awe.  Love it!

2.  Change!  Changes come in spring.  People clean their houses, change their jobs, their clothes, their demeanor, and even the homeless-looking guy who visits the Starbucks I frequent cut off his ridiculously long white beard.  Wouldn’t have recognized him – looks somewhat respectable now – except for the same army fatigue pants he wears every day and the shmatta (towel?) he covers his head with.

1.Spring means an end to winter programs for my kids, so say goodbye to hockey, but it also means saying hello to baseball (call me “coach”) and to being able to throw a ball around and walk to park and shoot hoops, or go for a bike ride, and work at losing the winter gut and getting back into a shape that doesn’t resemble a pear.

3 cheers to spring!

Hip hip, hooray

Hip hip hooray.

Hip… Hip… Achhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhooooooooooooooooooo

 

Geez, I hate spring!

 

 

 

Family Day 2017 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.


agoKite-making, skipping ropes and short films, oh my!

Kids take over the AGO for Family Day

 

WHAT:          On Monday, Feb. 20, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) once again transforms into the Kids’ Gallery of Ontario (KGO), with a jam-packed line up of artful activities inspired by the ongoing exhibition Francis Alÿs: A Story of Negotiation. Programming highlights include kite-making and bubble wrap-bursting, Gallery tours, family yoga, exciting interactive performances by the SOAR children’s skipping team and a screening of Small Cave, Big Cave, a new short film written by two Toronto seven-year-olds.

For more programming details and information on how to book discounted family passes, visit http://www.ago.net/family.

WHEN:          Feb. 20, 2017

Activities take place from 10:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.; please visit ago.net/family for a complete schedule of activities and times.

WHERE:       Art Gallery of Ontario.  317 Dundas St. W. Toronto, ON

TICKETS:     Admission is free for AGO members and children five and under. A special discounted family pass is available for advance purchase at www.ago.net/family for only $39. A family pass admits two adults and up to five youths (ages six to 17). Individual tickets are $11 for youth ages 17 and under, $16 for seniors and $19.50 for adults and can be purchased at ago.net, in person and over the phone at 416-979-6648.

 

The Urban Daddy: Bringing The Modern Dad To the Blogosphere


#TBT Tuesday to being featured in the Canada Writes series on “great Canadian Blogs” by the CBC.

http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/2014/08/bringing-the-modern-dad-to-the-blogosphere.html

By day, Warren Orlans is a mild-mannered tax consultant, shoehorning in time to be a hands-on dad to his three young children and to helm an impressive backyard vegetable garden. But by night (10 p.m. to 2 a.m., to be exact) he morphs into The Urban Daddy, blogging on everything from why a child whose age is less than your shoe size feels the constant need to correct you to the parenting situation that leads you to eat a nibbled, warm banana.
As part of our Canada Blogs series on great Canadian blogs, we chatted with Warren about handling your private blog going public, falling asleep mid-post and why daddy bloggers may be coming out of the woodwork.

When and why did you start The Urban Daddy?
I started The Urban Daddy in 2004, just before my first son was born. I wanted to keep a diary of my wife’s pregnancy, what it was like being a father for the first time, and other related, or non-related, events that caught my attention at that time. The blog was kept private for four years until a colleague caught wind of it and it became very public.
I also started writing The Urban Daddy to work on my grammar and punctuation, which were not strong points for me in school. I have come a LONG way from my earlier posts, and the few who followed me from post #1 through post #1,000 have commented on the huge difference in my writing.
You’re a very hands-on dad. What kinds of reactions do you get from people about this? Do you find there’s still some bias towards dads being so involved in parenting?
I am as hands on as I can be because I love being a dad, and I want to spend more time with my kids than my father was able to. I know life can be very short—my dad passed away at the age of 62, so he was at our wedding but did not get to see any of my children. I do not want my children to not have had the opportunity to know me, to learn from me and to be taught some of the wonderful traits that were passed on to my from my mother: respect, consequences of actions, and that others are entitled to their own opinions and sometimes it’s best to listen, smile and not say anything.
I also see many other dads hanging around their kids’ classes, at least in my community. I see it more and more. I don’t judge those who can or cannot be there—we all have choices to make—and I do not feel that there are people judging me for being there as often as I am. Or maybe I just convince myself that anyone judging me must be thinking how successful I am that I have the free time to participate in my kids’ lives so much.
There are a lot of “mommy” blogs out there, but not so many “daddy” blogs. Why do you think this is?
I usually do not mention my blogging because I long felt that I was a “fraud” by blogging standards, being a “daddy blogger.” Early on I was at a gathering with a bunch of friends (all new dads as well) and one father said, “I think people who blog are narcissistic and do so only to brag about themselves.” From that point on, I kept it to myself.
Nowadays, especially after being featured in The Globe and Mail and Canadian Living, I don’t hide anything. It’s what I like to do no matter what anyone thinks.
I do have mothers coming up to me and asking me if I blog, and the reaction from them is usually one of surprise and support. I get a lot of positive feedback from mothers and from involved dads, who by choice or necessity are more involved than dads who leave for work before their kids wake up and who return home after the kids are in bed.
You tell a lot of personal stories about your wife and family. Where do you draw the line in what you do and don’t write about?
When my blog was hidden, I had no boundaries, until one day a colleague at the government asked a very personal question that they would have only known to ask through my blog. From that point on, I treat each and every post as if it were very public and I think about how my kids would feel as adults reading it. Would they want me talking about embarrassing things, or just telling stories and highlighting milestones?
How does your family feel about your blog?
My family likes the blogging—some more than others—because I relay stories about my children that I’ve sometimes forgotten to tell them. I also do not air dirty laundry on my blog, so there are very few posts where I am venting about my family.
I think they are amazed at the attention The Urban Daddy has been getting over the past few years more than anything. I have never seen myself as a writer, and I appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read and comment on posts because there are so many other things they could be doing, but they are reading my ramblings, and I appreciate it.
You have another blog, inTAXicating. What’s the story of this blog?
InTAXicating came to me while I was working in the government and learning about how the Internet would help the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) collect money and educate taxpayers. As I progressed through collections, I was a Resource Officer for five years and that role was very technical, requiring me to understand and interpret the Income Tax Act and Excise Tax Act.  In order to get the level of understanding of legislation, I started re-writing the text into “English” and posting that on my blog.
So you have a day job, two blogs, and three kids. How exactly do you find time for all of this?
I don’t. Having my own business has made blogging as The Urban Daddy very difficult, and I have almost 200 posts sitting in my draft folder, in need of a good review. Prior to that I would generally blog from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. and I would schedule my posts to come out during the course of the week. When my first son was born, I was doing my MBA online and 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. was my time to work once everyone went to sleep, so I maintained that time as my time to get posts written.
Now I find I have so much work to do for my business that I spend time working on that instead of the blogging. But it changes, and sometimes I get extra time to bang out a post or two.
I’ve started going back to edit old posts, and I’ve found some where I clearly fell asleep in the middle of typing but posted them anyway. It’s a great reminder of my exhaustion back then.
What advice would you give to aspiring bloggers?
Do not get discouraged and do not write for others. Write for yourself first and try not to fret when only one or two readers come by your blog in a day, week or month. It takes time to build up a following. Reply to comments, follow other blogs, read them if you have the time and figure out what you want from your blog.
If you want to win awards, get hundreds of thousands of followers and use it to step up to a more prolific role, then stick to a topic or theme and write about it, and it only.
If you want your blog to be a journal to look at as your kids get older or to record things you might need, then write for the love of writing. If more comes of it, just say thank you and continue doing what you love doing.