It’s All My Fault!


canadian iglooIt’s all my fault.

Not the fault of the many who removed their snow tires, or put away their shovels, but my fault that it’s snowing in Toronto on April 4th.

And for that, I’m sorry.

You see we have family just south of the border in The United States of Donald Trump, and for what seems like the past couple of weeks, that area has been pounded by snow.

Snow.

I know, crazy, eh?

Since it is my long-lasting belief that most Americans believe that north of the boarder Canada is always covered in snow, I mockingly sent a Facebook message to said relatives telling them that they needed to move to Toronto, not the Southern US because it was plus 8 here and we hadn’t seen snow in quite a while.

I mean really…

Spring weather in Toronto.

Snow in the US…

In April.

 

Clearly Trump saw my message and commended Mother Nature to sick light snow flakes on the City along with 90 km/h winds.

 

Heck… I’ll take the little bit of snow and I’m okay that Americans generally think we live in igloos in exchange for not having to arm our school teachers with guns, and not electing incompetent leaders…

Wait.

Disregard the leader comment, and let’s stick with no guns!

Brrrrrr.

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June 15th is National Lobster Day! How to eat a lobster tips…


Did you know that June 15th is National Lobster Day in the United States and possibly in Canada as well?!?

I certainly did not know that until an email came into my inbox entitled “How To Eat A Lobster”, from Executive Chef Seth Levine (Hotel Chantelle, Penthouse808 at Ravel Hotel and The Regal).

Coincidentally, Hotel Chantelle, Penthouse808 and The Regal each just re-launched their own Lobster Bakes held weekly each Wednesday – which includes 1 whole lobster, steamed little neck clams, baked red russet potatoes and farm fresh corn on the cob for a prix-fixe price (price varies among venues).

The Lobster Bakes will be taking place throughout the duration of summer.

YUM!

Executive Chef Seth Levine’s Tips on How To Eat A Lobster:

  1. The easiest way to break down a lobster is by bending its joints backwards or twisting it out of its joints. This technique can be done with every movable part of the lobster.
  2. Skewer the lobster tail before cooking to keep it straight when cooking. It is easier to extract the tail meat when it’s cooked straight rather than when it’s curled.
  3. The leg meat is very sweet. After breaking them at their joints, eat them each like an artichoke. Hold one end with your teeth and pull the leg shells down with your fingers. Another sweet secret morsel of meat is in the tail fins- eat those similar to an artichoke as well.
  4. If you’re feeling adventurous, the green lobster liver is a delicacy also known as tomalley, and has some of the best flavor. Give it a try. Female lobsters may have a roe sack which turns bright red after cooking. Again, it is super flavorful and lobster lovers already know to dive right in.
  5. The knuckles take the most time to fish out the meat, but they are well worth it. Depending on how hard the shell is on your lobster, using crackers and a lobster pick are always your best tools of choice. The knuckles have very sharp spikes or points, so doing this with your hands can be dangerous. This is where most people end up cutting themselves when deconstructing a lobster.
  6. Lastly, the lobster body has hidden crevices all over. This takes the most time and effort to find them all. With smaller lobsters, the time and effort may not be worth it but on larger lobsters where the legs meet the body, you will find some delicious meat.

 

Enjoy your lobster on the 15th – and onward – and remember, it’s better to eat a lobster than to be in the sun without sun protection and look like a lobster.