Posted in Community, disaster, family, Life

What to do if you Witness an Accident in Toronto?


I had a very interesting day yesterday and I’m left wondering what to do with the information I have about an accident I witnessed yesterday afternoon.

I was on my way back from a visit with my friends at Creative Hockey Development who had their March Break camp at Chesswood Arena, and on my way to pick up my two oldest children from their day at The Monkey Vault.

I was driving South on Keele Street in the left-lane, and just approaching the traffic light just north of the 401 (south of Wilson Avenue) when the light turned amber.  There was a car in front of me, so I took my foot off the gas, and began to brake.

At the moment that I began to brake, the car beside me and a bit behind me, in the middle lane slammed his foot on the gas and accelerated towards the intersection.

As I was the second car in line, when I heard the acceleration, I looked up towards the intersection to see that the light was red, and there was a car turning left (heading West) crossing in front, and then I saw the car beside me enter the intersection and hit the car making the turn.

Fortunately, the car making the turn was aware enough to turn away from the car, limiting the impact to the drivers side door such that both cars ended up facing almost southbound, side-by-side.

They both popped out of their cars and looked at the damage – thankfully.

I couldn’t stop in the middle of the intersection, but I felt that the poor driver making the turn would be charged, when it was totally the car beside me who was at fault.

I circled trying to get close enough to hand my car to the driver who was hit, but by the time I made it near, tow trucks were already moving the cars.

I looked online and much of the information relates to hit-and-run accidents, which this was not.

In those cases, it is recommended to provide police with as much information as possible, including:

  • Your name, address and contact details
  • Time and place of the hit and run incident
  • Licence plate number of the fleeing vehicle
  • Vehicle description (colour, make & model)
  • Driver’s description
  • Description of what I saw.

 

Undaunted, I found this information from an article by the Globe and Mail;

Constable Melissa Wutke, with B.C. RCMP traffic services recommends, “If you witness an accident – and don’t just see the aftermath – you have to call police to tell them what you saw.  If you pull over immediately to report this collision, it is appropriate to dial 911. If it is hours after the collision and you call once you are at your destination, please use the non-emergency line to the police department nearest to where the collision occurred.”

So I will gather my information and provide it 12 Division and see what happens…

What would you have done?

Maybe a better question, what would you want others to have done if you were the car that was hit?

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Posted in news

April Fools Day! Origins and Best Of…


So today is April 1st, or April Fools Day (this is true, not a joke).

April Fools’ Day, also referred to by some as “All Fools’ Day” is an informal holiday celebrated every year on April 1st. The day is not a national holiday in any country, however it is widely recognized as a day when people play practical jokes and hoaxes on each other, called April fools.

Hoax stories are also often found in the press and media on this day – but not on the Internet, because we all know that everything on the Internet is 100% true, right?!?

Many believe that April Fools Day originated in In Iran, where jokes are played on the 13th day of the Persian new year (Nowruz), which falls on April 1 or April 2. This day, was celebrated as far back as 536 BC, and is referred to in Iran as “Sizdah Bedar”, making it the oldest prank-tradition in the world.

As far as April Fools Day pranks go – and many of us are already expecting there to be something so outrageous that it has to be a prank, but back in 1957, the BBC pulled a prank, known as the Swiss Spaghetti Harvest prank, where they broadcast a fake film of Swiss farmers picking freshly-grown spaghetti. The BBC were later flooded with requests to purchase a spaghetti plant, forcing them to declare the film a prank on the news the next day.

While that was a clever prank, some people take April Fools Da a little too far, such as, “An Australian woman called emergency services to tell them her baby had fallen off the bed and stopped breathing. When the ambulances arrived, there was no sick baby. It was her idea of a hilarious April Fool”.

But some fairly common pranks to look out for, and some classic pranks which garnered world-wide attention include these;

On April 1, 1976 famed British astronomer and radio presenter Patrick Moore announced over the BBC that a rare alignment of the planets Pluto and Jupiter would occur at exactly 9:47 a.m. during which the effects of gravity would be nullified and everyone on earth would feel weightless for a brief moment. “At 9:47, Moore declared, ‘Jump now!'”

A minute passed, and then the BBC switchboard lit up with dozens of people calling in to report that the experiment had worked!

But it was all a complete prank.

In more recent years some of the best April Fools jokes have been perpetrated by the advertising industry, specifically in 1996, when Taco Bell ran a full-page ad in the New York Times announcing it had purchased the Liberty Bell and would rename it the “Taco Liberty Bell.”

In 1998, Burger King announced the rollout of its “Left-Handed Whopper”, there has been stories about glasses for dogs, canned pizza, and in 2002 a British supermarket chain called Tesco published an advertisement in the British newspaper “The Sun” announcing the successful development of a genetically modified ‘whistling carrot.’ The ad explained that the carrots had been specially engineered to grow with tapered air holes in their side, which, when fully cooked caused the carrot to whistle.

On the Internet, hoaxes are such standard fare that April Fools’ Day is barely distinguishable from any other, but this one keeps getting brought up year-in-year-out, and makes me laugh – the announcement to that every computer connected to the World Wide Web must be turned off and disconnected for Internet Cleaning Day, a 24-hour period during which useless “flotsam and jetsam” are flushed from the system.

What stories have you seen today?

Did you get fooled?

Did you pull a prank on your kids, or them on you?

We toyed with the idea of moving all the kids into each other’s beds in the middle of the night, but geez, we’re so darn tired, I just told them about it in the morning.