How I Know I Have Embraced Being The Father To A Daughter: Leggings are NOT pants!!!


Leggings are NOT pants!

No pictures necessary.

No discussion needed.

Girls, women, transgendered people, even men… Leggings ARE NOT PANTS!!!

If you put leggings on and your shirt does not cover your bum, go home and change.  Please.

Whew.

Got that out.  I’ve been holding that in since the summer.  It really came to light when buying clothes for my daughter this past summer and still is a concern for me, and parents alike, I’m sure.

With the boys, it was pretty each to buy the same boring clothes for them; blue, brown, some black, some green.  When the girl arrived, I thought we would be smacked in the face with a whole new array of colour choices and options.   Sure, there are colours, but what is the deal with the choice of girls clothing available in some of these clothing stores???  low cut neck-lines, short shorts, and crop-style tops.  There is NO way I was going to let my daughter leave the house in a crop-top style shirt with short shorts, or worse, leggings.

So as her tastes evolved and we were able to agree on styles of clothing she knows that leggings are not pants, and that no one wants to see, or needs to see her bum during the day.

As this post tossed around inside my head, I thought that all I would need to do is post “Leggings are not pants” and that there is an understanding that this is true, but the more I thought about it, the more I could not help but understand the longer-term issues surrounded by leggings, especially in young, impressionable children…

“What if I’m not skinny enough to wear them?”  Does that come followed by, “I just won’t eat today.”  Or is there a group ganging up mentality from the girls who do wear them against the girls who don’t?  How about the girls who do not, cannot or choose not to wear them picking on a girl who wears them and shows too much…

Don’t think for a second that parents who dress their kids up in leggings don’t make a comment about their “ass”, and in the wrong child, at the wrong time of their life, could have long-lasting effect on their self-esteem.

UGH.

I’m all for leading a healthy life-style (well, my kids more than me right now) and being in the best shape possible, but that shape is physical, mental and emotional.  To place too much emphasis on one over the others can have dangerous consequences later in life.

So I call on you, parents, to please make sure that the next time your child leaves the house – if they have to wear leggings – that they have a shirt on to cover up.  Then give them a hug and tell them they are smart, kind, friendly and beautiful.

Here is a flowchart to help them (and you, if needed) understand this concept further.

AM-I-WEARING-PANTS

Editors Note: Apparently The Urban Daddy is not  so original is there are Facebook, Tumblr and Pinterest pages dedicated to this exact line of thinking…  The Brooklyn Momma hit the nail on the head in her post, here.  The flowchart is from her site.

Parents, How Often Has THIS Happened To You?


Parents, how often has THIS happened to you?

I came into my oldest son’s bedroom this morning and on his night table was not one, but 2 tubes of toothpaste.

He was still sleeping.

I had to ask, so I tapped him on the shoulder.

“Good morning Linus!” I said.

“Hi Daddy”, was his cheery reply.

“Why are there 2 tubes of toothpaste on your night table?” I asked, without judgement.

“For the commercial!” he replied.

“Oh” I said as I thought better of asking more questions. “You can sleep more if you would like”.

“Thanks Daddy”.

Canadian Living Likes The Urban Daddy too…


Father’s Day is a great time to check out some of the great Daddy bloggers on the Internet, especially the – ahem – Canadian ones.

I was thrilled when I received word from David Eddie who writes for Canadian Living saying he wanted to add my blog, The Urban Daddy, to his article titled; Daddy Blogs You Should Be Reading.

David, in case you were not already aware, has blogged under “Mack Daddy” and has written and published (is this not one in the same) a few parenting books;

  • Damage Control: How to Tip-Toe Away From the Smoking Wreckage of Your Latest Screw-Up With a Minimum of Harm to Your Reputation (2010)
  • Housebroken: Confessions of a Stay-at-Home Dad, (2003)
  • Chump Change (1999)

You can see more of David’s work, here.

Here is what David wrote; “Moms have ruled the blogosphere, but daddy bloggers are throwing their ball caps in the ring. Here are the daddy blogs you should be reading.

While women are naturals at communicating and forming communities, it’s tougher for us guys. I was a stay-at-home dad for many years—I even had a blog called Mack Daddy, which quixotically tried to make being an SAHD seem cool—and I know that, as a dad, you can feel isolated, like you’re the only guy in the world going through what you’re going through. Reading some other dude’s blog is one of the best cures. Dad bloggers offer a unique window into what men think about their lives in the wake of having children.

Maybe in some utopian future when we’re all riding around in hovercars, we will speak only of “parent bloggers,” making no distinction between male and female. Until then, dad blogs add a spicy flavour to the blogosphere. A flavour kind of like…barbecue.

Here are some of my go-to sites that let me know I’m not alone:

The Urban Daddy is the blog for products and practical tips, especially for things to do when your kids are driving you up the wall. Warren Orlans, the Toronto father behind the blog, says he’s “not your typical daddy,” and I’m not quite sure what he means by that. (What’s typical these days?) But, like me, he has a three-kid, two-career household. Also like me, he and his wife have the odds stacked against them: three to two. He’s very good on the topic of “juggling”—which is especially useful for readers who live in urban jungles. Don’t kid yourself: It is a jungle out there, and Urban Daddy is a great guide to avoiding the bear traps, vipers’ nests and poison darts.”

Please go read the entire article, here.

I Am A Stupid Idiot!


Daddy is a stupid idiotI m a stupid Idiot.  My 4-year-old daughter Boo, just told me this after smacking me on my backside.  I just have 2 questions… 1) How did she find out, and 2) What took her so long?!?

This is a recap of how it all came to be:

My daughter loves hiding! Loves it so much that when we announce that she should come out of hiding or there will be consequences (meaningful ones) she ignores it and stays in hiding and does so very quietly.

Her brother even helps her remain hidden, trying to throw us off the trail by announcing that he “swears” he has “no idea where she is.”

This morning instead of eating her breakfast, or helping me make their lunches and emptying the dishwasher, she hid.  This time it only took me 5-minutes to track her down through her giggles, but instead of finding her and playing her game, I announced that she had until the count of 5 to come out of her hiding spot otherwise, there would be meaningful consequences, that her and her enabling brother would have to make the rest of her lunch or she would go to school without one.

Meaningful consequence, right?

But she stayed hidden behind the door in our bathroom.

I thought for about 10 seconds about leaning on the door and squishing her until she gave up her hiding spot, but I was annoyed and frustrated, so I reached around the door and yanked her out.  Not being one of the boys she obviously did not appreciate this sudden end to her game and after protesting, she smacked me on the bum and said: “You’re a stupid idiot!”

I ignored her and was on my way back to the kitchen when she repeated it, a little less sure of herself, and with her mother looking her right in the eyes; “You’re a stupid idiot.”

Clearly my boys are teaching her all the good words, eh?

 

I walked into the kitchen and both boys looked at me open-eyed and silently.

I said to them as calm as I could; We don’t call people names because it is mean and we could hurt their feelings.”

They did not answer.  They knew that for the first time in her little life, she crossed the line.

 

What took her so long?  Is this what I can look forward to with girls?

Daddy, I Don’t Want To Hold Your Hand…


Well, it took only 4-years for this moment to arrive and I was not prepared for it, but walking my daughter to school she saw a teacher and a couple of her friends and she let go of my hand.

“Take my hand.” I said.

“I don’t want to hold your hand, daddy” was her reply.

“Oh.  Is it because your friends might see?”

“I just don’t”, she said.

I’m not going to force her to do anything she does not want to do.  She’s getting to be a big girl, so I walked beside her to the school doors, squatted down beside her, gave her a big hug and said, “I love you.”

 

Hmmmm…

 

Not ready for that moment, I have to say.

I remember when my oldest boy did that to me the first time.  I protested, and said, “Fine, just give me a hug.”

In front of his friends he refused to, so in a loud voice and a smile on my face – looking at his friends – I said, “Bye sweetheart.  I love you!” and I have him the biggest kiss possible.

We all laughed.

 

Walking home from school, my 2 youngest ran ahead, and I told this story to my oldest.

He said to me; “I’ll hold your hand, daddy”.

… and that was how we walked home.